Tag Archives: Karen Gillan

Avengers: Endgame (2019) Blu Ray Movie Review By D.M. Anderson

Avengers: Endgame Review

Directors: Anthony Russo, Joe Russo
Writers: Christopher Markus (screenplay by), Stephen McFeely (screenplay by)
Stars: Robert Downey Jr., Chris Evans, Mark Ruffalo, Chris Hemsworth, Scarlett Johansson, Jeremy Renner, Don Cheadle, Paul Rudd, Brie Larson, Benedict Cumberbatch, Chadwick Boseman, Tom Holland, Karen Gillan, Zoe Saldana, Evangeline Lilly, Bradley Cooper, Josh Brolin, Chris Pratt, Tilda Swindon, Dave Bautista, Anthony Mackie, Sebastian Stan, Elizabeth Olsen, Tessa Thompson, Benedict Wong

The major downside to catching Avengers: Endgame in theatres was the risk of subjecting my bladder to irreparable damage. In my younger days, simply holding-it for three hours was no big challenge. Back in college, I even once participated in a drinking challenge where we’d see who could go the longest without relieving ourselves. I didn’t win, but did manage to make it almost four hours.

Those were different times and Endgame is a different type of epic. We’ve all sat through three-hour films before, but thanks to the Infinity War’s open-ended resolution and plethora of unanswered questions – not-to-mention a year’s worth of fan theories and speculation – taking a bathroom break would risk missing a key scene, plot twist or revelation. I’ll give the Russo Brothers credit for one thing: Every scene in Endgame feels vital at the time, making it a tough movie to walk away from, even for a moment.

At the showing my family and I attended, not a single theatregoer got up to leave once the film started. Afterwards, the continuous sound of flushing toilets echoed throughout the lobby for five straight minutes. I, for one, made the mistake of buying a soda before the movie, which I began the regret around the 90 minute mark. By the third act, my screaming bladder made it a challenge to fully immerse myself the film’s numerous emotional payoffs.

So despite being a fitting, larger-than-life capper to Marvel’s 22-film story arc, Endgame ultimately plays better at home, at least for those of us not endowed with iron bladders. In addition to reacquainting myself with the story thus-far by revisiting Infinity War beforehand, seeing Endgame a second time – able to hit pause when nature called – was far more enjoyable.

While I still loathe the practice of stretching a single story across multiple movies, Endgame justifies its existence – and length – due to the sheer number of characters, story threads and loose ends to tie in a manner that meets expectations of legions of MCU fans. A taunting task, to be sure, which Endgame manages to pull off. The film remembers its past while acknowledging the future, and is well-aware of the finality its title suggests (for the story arc and some major characters). In that respect, Endgame pushes all the right emotional buttons.

But unlike the original Star Wars trilogy’s most iconic moments, Endgame meets expectations without really ever exceeding them. As viewers, we already have a laundry list of plot points awaiting explanation, questions to be answered and characters’ odds of living or dying. All those boxes are checked-off – often magnificently, sometimes poignantly – but there aren’t any revelations as jaw-dropping as learning who Luke’s father is. And even at three hours, there are simply too many characters for everyone to get adequate screen time (some don’t even appear until the climax). Fans of certain characters will inevitably be disappointed by what amounts to a cameo.

However, those are minor quips. Endgame is ultimately a slam-bang crescendo to this massive franchise, the likes of which we won’t likely see again for a long time. While sweeping and epic in scope, it’s still filled with the smaller, character-driven moments that have always made the MCU engaging (something DC is just now figuring out). I’ve personally never met anyone disappointed by the outcome. I’m sure they’re out there, but maybe their bladders were simply too full to enjoy it the first time.

Avengers: Infinity War (2018) Blu-Ray Movie Review By D.M. Anderson

Avengers Infinity War

Directors: Anthony Russo, Joe Russo
Writers: Christopher Markus (screenplay by), Stephen McFeely (screenplay by) 
Stars Robert Downey Jr., Chris Hemsworth, Mark Ruffalo, Chris Evans, Scarlett Johansson, Benedict Cumberatch, Don Cheadle, Tom Holland, Chadwick Boseman, Paul Bettany, Elizabeth Olsen, Anthony Mackie, Sebastian Stan, Chris Pratt, Dave Bautista, Zoe Saldana, Karen Gillan, Bradley Cooper, Josh Brolin, Pom Klementieff, Benedict Wong

The dust has settled, the hype has died down, the fanboys have scrutinised every frame and Avengers: Infinity War has already raked in $2 billion worldwide. Now it’s time to take a deep breath, look beyond the spectacle and obligatory fan-service to assess what is still essentially half a movie (though it’s still a lot better than Age of Ultron). 

I’ve always been pretty dubious over the practice of dividing a single story into two or more separate films. I understood Quentin Tarantino’s motives behind Kill Bill Volumes 1 & 2 because they were stylistically different. But two Breaking Dawns, two Mockingjays and three freaking Hobbits were just greedy, cynical cash-grabs calculated to prey on fans whose commitment to their beloved franchises gave them no choice but to open their wallets one more time than necessary.

But after seeing Infinity War twice now (once in theatres with everyone else, the second time for this Blu-ray review), I have to grudgingly concede that the decision to make it two movies might be justified (I’ll reserve a final verdict until next year). As it stands, this film has an unenviable task: Include nearly every major MCU character, work them into the film without regulating anyone to a gratuitous cameo while still moving the new story forward (“new” is relative, though…longtime fans have been aware of this coming war for years). 

For the most part, the film is successful, mainly because Marvel has done a pretty masterful job of laying the groundwork during the past decade of MCU movies. So when Peter Quill (Chris Pratt) engages in verbal chest-thumping with Thor (Chris Hemsworth), the story doesn’t need to spend time establishing their personalities the way a stand-alone film must. Speaking of which, the film’s best moments are when these iconic characters are meeting each other for the first time. Those involving one-or-more of the Guardians of the Galaxy are predictably the funniest, and sometimes surprisingly moving.

The downside, of course, is that anyone not fully up-to-speed with the doings in the MCU will be completely lost. Sure, they could (mostly) follow the story, maybe even a few of the subplots, but will have absolutely no emotional stake in any of these characters. And there’s no other film in the MCU that depends more on the audience’s investment in its characters than Infinity War (especially during the final act).

Even without the burden of character exposition, bringing them all together convincingly takes a considerable amount of time (which Infinity War does by presenting three concurrent subplots). Could the rising action leading to its epic climax have been trimmed-up a bit? Absolutely. Infinity War is occasionally meandering and apocalyptic battles are so standard in this franchise that simply making them longer doesn’t necessarily make them grander. However, the story doesn’t feel gratuitously padded just to squeeze-out two movies. Casual viewers may be impatiently checking their watches after ninety minutes, but it goes without saying that anyone who loves these characters won’t want it to end. 

But end it does, with whopper of a cliffhanger that’s more Empire Strikes Back than An Unexpected Journey. In other words, the story may be incomplete, but not the experience. And if all 18 of the previous entries in the MCU can be considered converging roads leading up to this moment, then perhaps two movies is justified. I guess we’ll all know for sure next year.

Until then, because of its size, scope, references to past events and plethora of Easter eggs, Infinity War makes better repeated viewing at home than the usual superhero film. Nobody but the most dedicated fanboys would be capable of catching everything the first time. On a related note, I’m sort-of surprised at how light this Blu-ray is on supplemental material. The featurettes are entertaining, but mostly promotional and pretty short compared to those included on many other Disney/Marvel releases. 

Jumanji: Welcome To The Jungle (2017) Movie Review By Darrin Gauthier

Jumanji WTTJ

Director: Jake Kasdan
Writers: Chris McKenna (screenplay by), Erik Sommers(screenplay by)
Stars: Dwayne Johnson, Karen Gillan, Kevin Hart and Jack Black

Plot:  Four teenagers are sucked into a magical video game, and the only way they can escape is to work together to finish the game.

Running Time:  119 Minutes

Rotten Tomatoes Score: Critics 76%   Audience 88%

Why I Watched It: The trailer looked like a lot of fun and then it came out and made a ton of money and also had pretty good reviews and yes I’m a fan of The Rock’s.

Random Thoughts: When I first heard they were doing another Jumanji my first instinct was this was a cash grab and there’s a whole generation that never heard of the first film and that also don’t play board games.  Then I heard The Rock was involved and they were updating it and it was more of a sequel/reboot so I was in.  This is something I wished Hollywood would do more of taking an older idea and doing something different with it.

What I Liked: Pure and simple this is a fun movie, you look up the definition of popcorn movie and you would see Jumanji’s  picture and that’s not an insult.  The film is just a lot of fun and it’s across the board fun, my 8 year old daughter loves it, I liked and the thing is they don’t play down for kids this is a funny action comedy for the whole family, yes I just wrote that.

Dwayne Johnson is truly on the top of his game, he’s not only good in his movies but he’s picking interesting films and films with good scripts, he’s not just gabbing the money he’s becoming a huge movie star.  He’s very good here playing type and against type in the same role, Johnson is very good playing off his imagine and I think the reason he’s so likable is that he has a very good sense of humor not many guys who look like Johnson have as good comedic timing as he does.

I also really liked Jack Black, who really nails playing a teenage girl trapped inside a middle age man and to be honest he gets the best lines and he’s kind of proven he’s back.  Karen Gillan now can put this beside Guardians Of The Galaxy on her resume, she’s a pretty good ass kicker.  I think the reason the film works so well is the four leads have great chemistry and all four are sharing the screen and not competing for it.

The action is solid and also they do a good job of turning a video game into a good action film, oddly Hollywood can’t do it with a real video game but here they capture the fun and style and it was really enjoyable.  The film also looks really good, they nail the tone and also the pacing to keep the story going.  I do think the main key is the humor, I think it what makes the film work without it you pretty much have a Indiana Jones rip off.

What I Didn’t Like: Nitpicks, really didn’t dislike much, Kevin Hart was playing Kevin Hart and it was too bad cause everyone else was playing against type but here Hart is doing very Hart like things, don’t get me wrong he’s funny but I wish he stretched a bit here.

They do a time thing late in the film, kind of a twist and it doesn’t make sense and that’s all i’ll say, but it is something that stands against the game’s logic.

And lastly I’ll say it, it’s a bit long at pretty much two hours, again nitpicks.

Final Thoughts: A fun film, a film you and you’re kids will like and a film that is very rewatchable.  A must watch.

Rating: 8/10

Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle (2017) Movie Review by John Walsh

Jumanji Welcome to the JungleDirector: Jake Kasdan
Writers: Chris McKenna (screenplay by), Erik Sommers (screenplay by)
Stars: Dwayne Johnson, Karen Gillan, Kevin Hart, Jack Black

It’s been nearly 22 years since the original Jumanji film released in the UK back in 1996. I’m going to level with you. This is a fact that I struggle to comprehend. I vividly remember watching Alan Parish (Robin Williams) pop out of the board game with his bushy beard and eccentric personality. And listen, despite not being the greatest film in the world, it had its charm and as a child I thoroughly enjoyed it.

Fast forward two decades and clearly somebody at Sony Pictures had a momentous brainstorm during a field trip to Vietnam or something because it was time for a new Jumanji film to enter our midst. Now again, I’m going to level with you. I wasn’t looking forward to this release. A conclusion formed from a combination of “not another bloody reboot” and apprehension at destroying a happy childhood memory. I’m pleased to say, however, that this film has surprised me and is actually pretty decent.

It’s not a reboot for one or at least I don’t think it is anyway. It appears to carry on in the same universe, opening in 1996 as a teenager called Alex happens upon the mysterious board game on a beach. He’s soon sucked into it and much like Parish before him, disappears off the face of the Earth. It then jumps into the present day and follows the daily routine of the awkward Spencer (Alex Wolff), as he does homework for his estranged friend Fridge (Ser’Darius Blain). An act which lands him and Fridge in detention.

Joining them in the cleaning duties are Bethany (Madison Iseman) and Martha (Morgan Turner). Almost inevitably, Spencer discovers the Jumanji video game in the storage room, they all join for a game (isn’t it convenient that there was four controllers?), picking a character each and then they’re all subsequently sucked into the game mere moments later. Now that we’ve got that rather boring cliched stuff out the way, the film takes us to a place the original never let us see. The actual environment Alan Parish was trapped in for all those years.

It also transforms our four teenage protagonists into distinctly different people. During their journey to the Jumanji universe (I don’t know what else to call it really), they become the actual game avatars they each selected. This causes much consternation as Spencer (Dwayne Johnson) has now tripled in size; Fridge (Kevin Hart) has shrunken by a similar amount; Bethany (Jack Black) has went from being a vain, phone obsessed blonde to a middle aged, fat man and Martha (Karen Gillan) has taken on a fiery, red head Lara Croft persona.

This aspect of the film was quite unique in its application and the most enjoyable part for me. Just off the top of my head, I can’t recall it ever really happening before in a film. Red Dwarf did something very similar in an episode, but I really enjoyed the way they flipped things around here, completely changing the dynamics between the four in doing so. It also flung up the crazy situation of Jack Black playing a teenage girl.

It then introduces the quartet to the mission they face, the games interesting mechanics (certainly surrounding the re-spawning), each character’s strengths and weaknesses, and also propels the film straight into action in doing so. The general gist of the films plot at least superficially anyway, is that they have to find a gem and take it to a mountain top, before calling out Jumanji. If you scratch under the surface however there’s deeper stuff going on within each character. They all have to work together just to make it through the world and learn about strengths and traits they never thought they possessed.

I thought the leading quarter were all very strong and I struggle to pick a definitive favourite, but if you were to twist my arm then I’d probably go for Jack Black. It was incredible the way he took on the personality of a teenage girl. He really imbued the film with plenty of comedic moments. Dwayne Johnson was great again in a role that is right up his street. There was also a slight fragility to his character that we don’t often see. Kevin Hart was his usual self. He’s got brilliant chemistry with Johnson and there was a few hilarious moments between the two. Karen Gillan is a great actress and she perfectly embodied the shy, awkwardness of Martha.

If I was to have one criticism of the film then it would be the distinct lack of threat throughout. There was an antagonist in there, but honestly, he made so little impact on me that I couldn’t even tell you his name. There was never a point in the film when I felt any of them would die. For instance, Bethany sacrifices a life (they’ve got three each), which incidentally signalled a new found maturity to save Alex (Nick Jonas), yeah he giddily pops up to meet them in a town they visit, but the moment lacks impact for the reason above.

Indeed, they’re all whittled down to one remaining life by the end, but there’s a very James Bond-esque inevitably about their survival.

Speaking of endings, this one was a fairly identikit happily ever after effort. There’s a quick showdown, they manage to save Jumanji, make it back to the real world and everyone is on friendly terms. Spencer and Martha get together and even Alex was returned back to 1996, not missing a day, which in turn causes a whole Back to the Future alternate reality shift. Which leaves me pondering that Alan Parish must’ve been a right unlucky git.

Now I know that sounds hypercritical of me, but I really did enjoy this film. The visuals were outstanding, the characters were pretty well fleshed out and had good chemistry together, the humour was a hit for the most part and the action was excellent. It was a stereotypical popcorn flick that frankly flew in and I would have zero hesitation in recommending it to just about everybody.

Rating: 3.5/5

The Circle (2017) Movie Review by Stephen McLaughlin

THE CIRCLE

Director: James Ponsoldt
Writers: James Ponsoldt (screenplay), Dave Eggers (screenplay)
Stars: Emma Watson, Tom Hanks, John Boyega, Glenne Headly, Bill Paxton, Karen Gillan, Ellar Coltrane

Having watched “The Circle” on Netflix I have mixed feelings about this film in so many levels. The main character portrayed by Emma Watson “Mae” is in a dead end job and portrays a young lady with an unfulfilled life. Receiving a life changing call from her best friend Annie (Karen Gillan) that she has been accepted into the world’s largest and most powerful tech and social media company “The Circle”

“The Circle” facility isn’t much different from working environments that major companies such as Apple or Microsoft create in blending working life with social life and an informal office space. Mae rises through the ranks and is encouraged by the founder of “The Circle” Eamon Bailey (Tom Hanks) to engage in groundbreaking experiments that push the boundaries of privacy, ethics and ultimately her personal freedom. Her personal life and in particular her family are affected by the environment that she becomes involved in.

Staying on this side of the characters it was one of the plus points of the movie and if they had shown us more of the effect on her family I think the movie would have been better balanced and added more Drama. Sadly portraying her parents Vinnie and Bonnie were the late great actors Bill Paxton and Glenne Headly who only passed away this year and tragically only 4 months apart. Both Paxton and Headly are fine in this movie and the characters give the movie some humanity and roundedness that is necessary in this story.

John Boyega (Ty) and Karen Gillan (Annie) sadly with their acting credentials they are supporting characters at best and don’t offer much to the storyline other than a link to normality for Mae as does the character of Mercer played by Ellar Coltrane who could have been potential boyfriend material for Mae at the beginning of the movie but dissipates as the story unfolds and only serves as a moral compass at the movies climax.

I mentioned earlier that I have mixed feelings about this movie and that is because of the acting line up for this movie offered so much talent but disappointingly come off a little wooden at times and I’ll even go as far as saying a little cringey at times with their delivery and dialogue. That’s not a direct dig at James Ponsoldt who Directed the movie and wrote the screen play. I just felt that some scenes felt over explained and dragged on and felt the Director was overemphasising the need to assume his audience would require a lot of the script to be dumbed down to understand the “techy speak”

I’ve been a fan of Tom Hanks for over 30 years now and he rarely disappoints and although the character of Eamon Bailey the founder of “The Circle” comes off as a Steve Jobs / Mark Zuckerberg hybrid pioneer I didn’t hate the character as much as the filmmaker was intending Bailey to be as the “Villain” of the movie. Just like the Jobs and Zuckerbergs of this world they pushed the technology envelope as far as they could and were always looking for the next “What Next?” in their companies. That doesn’t make them the bad guy in any sense. I have to admit I hated the staff at “The Circle” more.

“The Circle” if I am comparing similar tones is a blend of “The Social Network” and “The Truman Show” where it attempts to test the audiences feelings on privacy and morals but just falls flat as another flaw I felt in the movie was when this story takes place. If it’s in the near future then I can accept some of the processes and ideas the company are trying to project as they appear flawed and a little far fetched but “could” be possible one day (I’m thinking George Orwell’s novel Nineteen Eighty-Four predictions)

In Summary “The Circle” is a not bad film. Yes it has it flaws like most films and the potential is always greater than the end result. I would recommend giving it a watch as the subject matter is interesting enough although the drama is a bit run of the mill, it does make you think (however crass at times) I would give it a go.