Tag Archives: Patrick Stewart

The Kid Who Would Be King (2019) Blu-Ray Review By D.M. Anderson

The Kid Who Would Be King Review, A band of kids embark on an epic quest to thwart a medieval menace.

A Curmudgeon’s Guide 

Director: Joe Cornish
Writer: Joe Cornish
Stars: Louis Ashbourne Serkis, Dean Chaumoo, Angus Imrie, Patrick Stewart

I hate using the term, “They don’t make ‘em like this anymore,” a phrase mostly used by grumpy old curmudgeons to express their contempt for anything with mass appeal to generations other than their own. I suppose I am a grumpy old curmudgeon in some ways. Sorry kids, but your music sucks. The latest Metallica album, though? Man, they don’t make ‘em like that anymore.

But while that adage kept popping into my mind while watching The Kid Who Would Be King, it wasn’t out of longing for the good ol’ days. But in point of fact, the film is quite unlike what generally passes for family entertainment these days. It isn’t animated, nor is it based on a book series, comics character, video game or line of toys. There’s no questionable language, scatological gags, overt slapstick or any other pandering attempt to garner giggles. Though it’s often quite funny, the film earns its laughs through the characters’ interactions and the situations the story puts them in.

Updating the Arthurian legend with modern kids is a great concept. Writer-director Joe Cornish wisely opts to create a straightforward fantasy-adventure, cleverly acknowledging the more familiar elements of King Arthur’s tale while spinning a fresh story of his own. After drawing Arthur’s sword, Excalibur, from a stone at a construction site, 12-year-old Alex (Louis Ashbourne Serkis…yeah, Andy’s kid) is tasked to stop Arthur’s evil half-sister, Morgana, from returning to wreak havoc on the world. After Merlin (Angus Imrie) arrives to gravely inform him what’s at stake, Alex must recruit both friends and enemies to aid him in his quest, which will take them across England.

Despite running two full hours, the film is consistently engaging and fun, with believable characters performed by an able young cast. Though Patrick Stewart shows up as an older version of Merlin and Rebecca Ferguson plays Morgana, the rest of the adults are peripheral characters. Even Merlin is primarily presented as a 16-year-old who assists and advises Alex and his “knights” in their quest to thwart Morgana. None of the characters come across as composites or broadly-drawn caricatures. Even the two bullies of the film are pretty well-rounded.

Though the film starts a little slow, once things get rolling and they begin their quest, The Kid Who Would Be King is a rousing adventure with some great action sequences bolstered by imaginative special effects (Morgana’s army of demons is particularly impressive). The climactic battle at the kids’ school is genuinely thrilling and often pretty damn funny. Like all family films, there’s an underlying message, of course, and considering the tumultuous state of the world right now, the one presented here couldn’t be more timely. A lot of adults could stand to be reminded of it, too.

Best of all, there isn’t a cynical moment in the entire film. Despite the title – a play on Kipling’s unrelated novel – this isn’t so-much a kiddie flick as it is an epic adventure that just happens to be suitable for the entire family. It’s a damn shame we live in a world where this tanks at the box office while The Emoji Movie rakes in millions (oops…I’m letting the curmudgeon in me show again). On the other hand, Willy Wonka and The Iron Giant were initially bombs and now everybody loves them. Maybe The Kid Who Would Be King can find the audience it deserves on home video, too, or else they might not make ‘em like this anymore. Highly recommended for everybody.

Advertisements

The Kid Who Would Be King (2019) Movie Review By Philip Henry

The Kid Who Would Be King

Director: Joe Cornish
Writer: Joe Cornish
Stars: Louis Ashbourne Serkis, Dean Chaumoo, Angus Imrie & Patrick Stewart

Joe Cornish hasn’t made a movie since Attack the Block in 2011, which introduced the world to John Boyega who went on to do a couple of other little sci-fi movies. It was a film that disappointed me, despite the subject – aliens – being right up my street. Cornish lost me in the opening minutes when his gang of hoodies mugged someone. These are the guys we’re supposed to be rooting for throughout the rest of the movie, but after the mugging and them showing no remorse for it, I found it hard to care about them and thought they deserved everything they had coming to them. Yes, I am very aware that I would be a terrible judge.

The Kid Who Would Be King starts off in similar territory, with school bullies using their strength and size to hurt and rob smaller kids in the playground, and again, these are characters that we’re supposed to care about later on in the film. The difference is, this time I did. Cornish has learned that a little backstory goes a long way to explaining why seemingly bad kids do the stuff they do.

I remember the King Arthur legend from my youth; well, enough to nod when certain key points come up or characters arrive, so it did make me smile to see how many little references are buried in this film. Not just in the script but in visuals and set designs too.

If you’ve seen the trailer you probably thought this looked like another Harry Potter rip-off, but it actually reminded me much more of Lord of the Rings. The long shots of them walking over plains and hills on their quest are an obvious nod to Peter Jackson’s films and the final climactic battle in the school is like the battle of Helm’s Deep re-fought at Grange Hill. Despite the large budget ($60M reportedly) the film still feels intimate and British in the best possible way, with quirky humour and council house dialogue scenes grounding it in a realism most movies with this budget would steer clear of. But it works! You care about these kids from the get-go because the mix of fantasy and reality makes it relatable, in the same way as the Potter books and films always starting with Harry at his aunt and uncle’s house do. It’s a little detail, but it’s important.

Louis Ashbourne Serkis (king of motion-capture Andy’s son) is very good in the lead. He’s small but has an inner strength and sense of right and wrong that we never doubt for a second. His best friend Bedders (Dean Chaumoo) is the comedy relief and is reminiscent of Peter’s friend Ned in Spider-man: Homecoming, and he also has his own little story arc to complete. But special recognition has to be given to Angus Imrie, playing the young version of Merlin – Patrick Stewart plays the older version – who is so off-the-wall and madcap that he feels like he’s jumped off the page of a Douglas Adams novel. The cast give it their all and it shows. This has obviously been a labour of love for Cornish and I think the end result is a very enjoyable movie with its heart in the right place.

The young leads may prove off-putting for many fantasy fans, even though they’re dealing with the same issues teenage and even grown-up heroes are still dealing with. There is a good deal of wish-fulfilment in many SFF fans, so those who dream of finding themselves in Han Solo’s shoes (and Princess Leia’s arms), probably don’t dream of being a short, bullied twelve year-old, so this film may have trouble earning back its budget, which is a shame, because it’s really quite impressive and the sort of thing I wish got made more often in Blighty. 

So good on you, Joe – this is epic. The days of ‘it might look a bit crap but that’s because we make it ourselves’ are firmly behind you. Come on, who gets that reference?

Dune (1984) Movie Retro Review By D.M. Anderson

Dune Review

Director: David Lynch
Writers: Frank Herbert (novel), David Lynch (screenplay)
Stars Kyle MacLachlan, Francesca Annis, Patrick Stewart, Sean Young, Jurgen Prochnow, Everett McGill, Max von Sydow, Richard Jordan, Kenneth McMillan, Sting, Brad Dourif, Dean Stockwell, Jose Ferrer, Virginia Madsen.

Home Remedy

As someone who doesn’t have money falling out his ass, I try to cut corners where I can. This is also probably why my wife seldom sends me to the grocery store by myself anymore, even when armed with a list, because I’ll usually come home with the cheapest shit on the shelves. Whenever I’ve argued there’s no difference between Diet Pepsi and the store brand knock-off, she’s countered with, “Then why buy a Blu-Ray when the DVD is five bucks cheaper?”

Well played, Francie, well played.

While it’s okay to cut some corners at the supermarket, I learned the hard way over the years not to pick up bargain brands of certain products unless I wish to incur my family’s wrath. At my house, it’s Best Foods mayo or nothing. I brought home a jar of Miracle Whip one time and, based on everyone’s reaction when I pulled it from the grocery bag, you’d have thought it was a human head. When it comes to dog food, my wife brought it to my attention that chicken products are bad for Wheaten Terriers, so simple Dog Chow is now out of the question. Have you ever tried to find dog food that doesn’t contain chicken? It’s like looking for one Waldo in a sea of other Waldos, and when you finally do find that bag o’ cluck-free kibbles, be ready to dip into your child’s college fund.

In my house, the same best-or-nothing mantra applies to ice cream, salad dressing, cereal, pain relievers, butter, juice, pancake syrup, lunch meat, cheese and feminine hygiene products.

Regarding the last item on that list, I’ve since flat-out refused to ever buy them again on my own. Not that I’m embarrassed or anything, but I live in a houseful of females, all of whom now endure their monthlies (yes, fear for me). Whenever someone’s cycle would start without warning, my wife used to make the stupid mistake of trusting me to venture to Walgreens for these items with instructions regarding which brand and type. However, there are more varieties of napkins and tampons than there are stars in the heavens. Directions for assembling IKEA furniture are less confusing than the obscure labels and charts plastered on these products, which minutely differentiate one type from another. As a guy with no personal frame-of-reference regarding menstrual maladies, of course I’m gonna pick the cheapest thing which most closely resembles the instructions handed to me. After all, pads are pads, right?

Hence, one of our bathroom cupboards is filled with feminine products purchased by yours truly that no women in my house are willing to use. I suppose exchanging them for the right product was an option, but I’ve since found other uses for them, such as makeshift coffee filters, killing spiders and wiping dust from my precious home theater system. In fact, there are websites which show a variety of alternative uses for sanitary napkins. Seriously.

As other thrifty homebodies can attest, you can save a lot of hard-earned cash by turning worthless items into something handy. Used coffee grounds make great garden fertilizer, Coca-Cola is an effective toilet bowl cleaner, the Nickelback CDs you’re now ashamed to admit owning make terrific retro-hip beverage coasters for your next shindig, and those old dirty pillowcases are perfect for the idiots in your life who’d benefit from a pummeling by a sack of doorknobs.

Then there are myriad home remedies which can cure what ails you. A stick of butter applied to a burn provides immediate relief (unless you’re on fire, of course), snorting a few lines of Drano will clear those sinuses right up, and punching someone in the stomach will temporarily help them forget about that migraine headache. I sometimes suffer from bouts of insomnia, but since this only occurs occasionally, it doesn’t make much sense to spend ten bucks on an entire bottle of potentially-addicting sleeping pills…not when I’ve got my trusty old DVD copy of Dune handy.

Helmed by the perpetually psychotic David Lynch (who turned down Return of the Jedi to direct this), Dune is an all-star trainwreck that bombed in theatres when initially released in 1984, but has since found a sizable cult following (like most of Lynch’s films, actually). It’s based on the classic novel by Frank Herbert, one of the biggest sci-fi douchebags this side of Harlan Ellison. I say this because back in 1983, Iron Maiden recorded a song inspired by Dune and respectfully asked permission to title it after the novel. Herbert’s publicist responded with, “No. Because Herbert doesn’t like rock bands, particularly heavy rock bands and especially rock bands like Iron Maiden.”  Never mind the fact Maiden was huge at the time and Herbert hadn’t written a relevant novel since Dune was published back in 1965. In fact, Maiden’s song, retitled “To Tame a Land,” likely turned more young readers onto this old fart’s novel than the now-legendary Hollywood flop which effectively killed any chance of Dune ever becoming a film franchise.

To say Dune is convoluted would be an understatement. Upon its release, Universal felt the need to provide ticket buyers with a two-page glossary of terms used in the film, apparently forgetting nobody can read in the dark. Unless you’ve actually read the book, the story itself is perplexing enough to make 2001: A Space Odyssey look like Flash Gordon. It’s also bloated with about 12,000 characters to keep track of, their dialogue & actions sometimes making little sense without your book and glossary handy. Speaking of dialogue….it is really fucking bad, especially the overuse of character voiceovers in a futile attempt to clarify what’s going on. As for the performances…they range from low-key & earnest to godawful & over-the-top. The same could be said about the special effects. Except the sandworms, of course. Those things are awesome.

Still, I’ve always kind of liked Dune. Sure, it’s long, slow and hard to follow, but there’s also an ethereal quality to much of its imagery and music which I’ve always found somehow relaxing, particularly during the first half. For me, watching Dune is like receiving a therapeutic massage while new age music drifts throughout the room. Actually, I don’t recall the last time I watched the film in its entirety because it usually lulls me to sleep before the first sandworm even shows up. That suits me fine because Dune gets really stupid during the second half.

All of which means Dune serves a useful purpose in my household. As a teacher, I typically get so used to staying up late during the summer that it’s difficult to hit the sack early on those nights just before returning to work. But rather than rely on synthetic sleep aids, all I do now is pop in Dune, turn off all the nights and nestle into the couch with a blanket and a beer. More often than not, I’m soon zonked and snoring like an toddler on Benadryl.

Regardless of what one thinks of the movie, Dune is often pretty to look at (except for the whole heartplug scene) and the soundtrack is wonderful, the only decent thing Toto ever recorded. If you’re one of those still inclined to write it off as another overwrought Hollywood disaster, might I suggest keeping a copy around as a safe, non-addictive alternative cure for your insomnia? As a home remedy, it’s ultimately a lot cheaper and you’ll still wake up feeling refreshed…probably with the “Prophecy Theme” stuck in your head. 

Logan (2017) Movie Review by Darrin Gauthier

Logan

Director: James Mangold
Writers: James Mangold (story by), Scott Frank (screenplay by)
Stars: Hugh Jackman, Patrick Stewart, Dafne Keen

Plot:  In the near future, a weary Logan cares for an ailing Professor X, somewhere on the Mexican border. However, Logan’s attempts to hide from the world, and his legacy, are upended when a young mutant arrives, pursued by dark forces.
Running Time: 2 hours 17 minutes
Rotten Tomatoes Score: Critics 93%   Audience 90%

Why I Watched it: A R-Rated Wolverine movie how could you say no.
Thoughts: Now it took me awhile to watch this and it’s because of the hype, it’s the one thing with fan boys now nothing is just good it has to be called the best, the best comic book movie, the best Wolverine movie, and I have to say with watching the trailers it looked dark which I like but it also looked somber, not sure I wanted a depressing Wolverine movie.  The other thing I will say going into the review just because something is different doesn’t make it better so much has been made of Logan being a great film cause it’s different from other super hero movies, and it is but just on that fact alone doesn’t make it better.

What I Liked: Hugh Jackman will always be Logan, he just nails the character and for me he’s been the best part of the X-Men franchise, he never sleeps walks and he always shows heart and emotion playing Logan.  In this film I think Patrick Stewart is even better he gets to be sad, funny, noble, wise and also tired.  We’ve never got to see comic book characters end or get old, there’s no riding off into the sunset for these guys cause comics by their nature get to reboot whenever they want but you get the sense in both Stewart’s and Jackman’s performances that they’re saying goodbye to dear friends.

One thing I want to point out here there’s a couple of fight scenes and they’re just wicked, I don’t think I’ve ever seen fight scenes in this genre being this ferocious, the energy in these fights are off the charts.  Really like the young actress Dafne Keen, she does a lot in her fights, she has personality in her fights. For a young actress she has a very strong presence.  I liked half of Boyd Holbrook’s performance the first half and boy this guy can be a star. A lot of talk has gone into what this film is like and for me it’s the first comic book movie to really look at the person not the character, not the ability but what cost they’ve paid to be what they are and yes they take that to the grave.  It’s like ‪The Wild Bunch‬ and Unforgiven was to Westerns, bare bones the grit and reality of it all.

What I Didn’t Like: I had a few major problems with the film, and I didn’t care for the writing of Logan this time around, look Jackman owns it but he’s so one note here it bothered me, I get he has demons but come on, he has no charm and no sense of humor at all and just yells at everyone, his lines are just saying “take your pills, there’s no more mutants, I don’t care, there’s no Eden it’s a dumb comic book” Take a drink for every time he’s wrong in this film, he’s not an anit-hero he’s an annoying old man and I wouldn’t want to be in the same room as him.  Now I don’t think it worked and I don’t like the character as written in this film.  Also I was very disappointed in no word building here, they say the future they say no more mutants, how?  what’s the world like now?  How did we get there?  Also are we going from the comics or the movies?  Never got the sense of this future.

I found the film boring and slow at times and the sub-plots didn’t work for me, it’s like now all comic book films feel they have to be over 2 hours the long running time shows how important it is.  Near the end all the momentum is drained from the film, hey let’s have three scenes of Logan sleeping, the drama. The ending left me cold, look we all knew what was going to happen and it didn’t move me the way it should, they set this up not of wondering what will happen but when it will.  Really the main bad guy is an evil doctor, really?  Boy it’s so different.

Final Thoughts: It was for the most part a well done film and for the record I liked that it was R-Rated and I liked seeing these characters again played by these actors.  It’s just not the greatest anything of all-time and it doesn’t have to be to be a solid film.

Rating: ‪6/10‬

X-Men: Days of Future Past (2014) Movie Retro Review By Stephen McLaughlin

DAYS OF FUTURE PAST

Director: Bryan Singer
Writers: Simon Kinberg (screenplay), Jane Goldman (story by)
Stars: Patrick Stewart, Ian McKellen, Hugh Jackman, Jennifer Lawrence, Peter Dinklage, James McAvoy, Michael Fassbender

With Bryan Singer back to basically do a “Doctor Sam Beckett” from Quantum Leap and put right what once went wrong he has the freedom of time travel to unravel the majority of plot holes from the disaster that was “The Last Stand” and a few little niggles from the impressive “First Class”

With the Movie opening in a bleak future controlled by Sentinels which are mutant hunting machines that can eliminate any mutant despite their powers. The Sentinels are adaptive and have the ability to counteract any of the abilities the last of the mutants are capable of and destroy them.

With only a few mutants left they have discovered a way of going back in time a few days earlier through the mind to warn their previous selves of any upcoming attacks and erase their existence in those scenarios. Time us running out for them though and Professor X and Magneto come together to devise a plan that could save the mutants from extinction. The X-Men send Wolverine (Hugh Jackman) to the early 1970’s in a desperate effort to change history and prevent an event that results in doom for both humans and mutants.

The event being Raven / Mystique (Jennifer Lawrence) assassinating Dr. Bolivar Trask (Peter Dinklage) in her belief eliminating the creator of the Sentinels would be the end of the project. Unfortunately with a mutant murdering a human the government felt threatened by the mutants and continued with Trask’s project and through capturing Raven / Mystique where able to experiment with her DNA in creating more advanced Sentinels that could adapt and destroy any mutant despite their power.

Ellen Page is back as Kitty Pryde. You remember her? the tiny mutant that could run through walls. Well now she can send mutants back in time with mind control. I don’t get it either but it works and you are better not thinking too hard on that one and just accept it as this is the premise of the storyline. Also this movie is based on the Comic Book so you can’t argue with that okay.

After the events (a decade later) of First Class both Erik Lehnsherr and Charles Xavier are no longer friends. Xavier is now a recluse living with Hank McCoy (Nicholas Hoult) in the grounds that used to be “The School for Gifted Youngsters” and after the alleged assassination on President Kennedy, Erik Lehnsherr is now under heavy guard within the foundations of a purpose built prison inside the Pentagon. It is Wolverine’s task to unite the two former friends in preventing Raven / Mystique assassinating Trask.

The Director of Photography Newton Thomas Sigel who previously worked on X-Men (2000) and X-Men 2 (2003) and further Bryan Singer Projects (The Usual Suspects, Superman Returns and the sequel to this film X-Men: Apocalypse (2016) has his mark all over this movie and in a good way. The 1970’s are portrayed in an authentic fashion and not shoehorning everything 1970’s related into every shot that I felt That ’70s Show did (with intent or not) The film has a dark tone to it from the opening sequences that really portrays the future as a decelate environment and a reality with no hope to it.

Gathering an ensemble of Hollywood’s finest is also a Director’s dream or nightmare. You get the sense that everyone from both “generations” of X-Men films wanted to be involved in any small way. I will stop there as I don’t want to ruin any surprises that are in store for anyone who hasn’t saw the movie yet but I was impressed by how well balanced that screen time is for the main characters but also impressed with the screen time or limited from previous characters from previous x-men films receive, no matter how big or small the actor is, they are all there to be part of this event. All Egos have been left at the door.

Again Hugh Jackman is carrying the storyline from beginning to end and it will be interesting to see how the franchise copes with his absence now he finished his involvement in the superb Logan (2017) Both First Class (2011) and X-Men: Apocalypse (2016) have cameos that didn’t really have to be there but nevertheless both scenes are standouts in the movie no matter how brief they were.

Days of Future Past was necessary to keep the franchise in its current state continuing without a massive reboot and also complements the prequel First Class by having the main characters involved in this crossover that sets up the next couple of X-Men Films superbly with the acting credentials of McAvoy, Fassbender and Lawrence to name a few. I would put Days of Future Past up there with the excellent X-Men 2 (2003) and it is a film I can rewatch over and over again. Highly Recommended.

Logan (2017) Movie Review by Stephen McLaughlin

Logan

Director: James Mangold
Writers: James Mangold (story by),  Scott Frank (screenplay)
Stars: Hugh Jackman,  Patrick Stewart,  Dafne Keen, Stephen Merchant, Boyd Holbrook, Richard E Grant

After two excellent trailers “Logan” is the movie everyone has been anticipating for the last year or so. Again Logan (The Wolverine) is using his birth name of James Howlett in the year 2029 trying to lead an ordinary existence driving a limo as a driver. whilst in his spare time looking after his old friend and mentor Charles Xavier (Professor X) who is now sick and old and is having seizures that are so blinding they are effecting the last reminisce of the mutants on earth that Logan tries to contain by giving Charles his medication on time. Accompanying both the Professor and The Wolverine is the albino mutant Caliban (Stephen Merchant) whose ability is sensing and tracking others of his kind. All three of them live in the outskirts of nowhere on a run down old farm leading a recluse life in which seems to me just living out the remainder of their lives.

Logan has been tracked down by a lady named Gabriela (Elizabeth Rodriguez) asking for his help to get a young girl to the Canadian border for her own safety as both have been pursued by Donald Pierce played by Boyd Holbrook. We first meet Gabriela at one of Logan’s driving jobs (at a funeral service) where Logan doesn’t want to know anything about what she is asking as he is trying his best to keep a low profile and  Gabriela knows more than enough about Logan being The Wolverine and his abilities to protect and handle himself.

Pierce’s first intervention with Logan is short and at times shows a respect for the one time well known X-Men and makes it clear that he isn’t tracking down The Wolverine or Professor X (who he admits would like to meet) but the Young Girl who goes by the name of Laura (Dafne Keen) who is labelled X-23.

You visibly see Logan is old and a shadow of his former self but by going on this reluctant mission he unlocks some of the old Wolverine inside of him and we see snippets of this throughout the movie and involving X-23 when she’s more capable than Logan and Professor X thinks and she’s able to fend for herself.
Logan also begins to realise things about himself through the vision of this little girl because they have striking similarities.

It has to be said that every scene in this film feels necessary and not shoehorned in from the character development to the humour and action. Nothing feels forced and everything comes off natural which is refreshing and a great testament to these characters that we have grown and loved for the past 17 years in the cinematic world and especially as it is both the original actors Stewart and Jackman who just fit right into their characters as if they have never been away (especially Stewart who apart from limited time in X-Men: Days of Future Past and a cameo in X-Men Origins: Wolverine hasn’t really played the part for a good decade) and I was very pleased with that.

Hugh Jackman gives it all in this his final performance as Logan and I don’t think many people will disagree he has saved the best for last after than disappointing Origins story and the okay “The Wolverine”. I don’t think we have seen The Wolverine this vulnerable. He’s now old, he’s beaten and walks with a slight limp. He doesn’t  heal like he used to and this is down to the conviction from Hugh Jackman in the movie. Jackman has always stood out from the rest in the X-Men franchise with his portrayal as Wolverine/Logan and that’s partially down to the Character but mostly down to the actor portraying his take on the character. He hits the nail on the head with this somber performance and you just know he wants the character to go out with a bang.

The real surprising standout performance is from Dafne Keen who plays Laura (X-23). She gives Logan a run for his money on the brutality who is this mysterious young girl born with a same clawing-wielding gift as Wolverine. At first Keen didn’t talk and I thought this was going to be for the rest of the movie with some nods and shakes of the head for conversation in between going on violent rampages and the occasional Spanish-spoken lines, but it’s the subtly in her character that stands out as you begin to see she cares for Logan and Charles and I think by the end of watching the movie the audience want to see more of Keen as Laura in her own stand alone movie or as part of a new generation of x-men….or in this case x-children. I can see why a lot of folk would want this as there is that potential to continue the story in this universe now that Jackman, Stewart etc are hanging up their boots as mutants and it also looks like the First Class mutants have finished their trilogy with the bitterly disappointing Apocalypse. So why not continue the story instead of a reboot?

Patrick Stewart who proudly reprising his role as Charles Xavier has done what is needed for his character and he does it with perfection. With the aged Xavier now handicapped without his ability to walk, Stewart gives a blissful, if occasionally humorous portrayal as this signature role and there is a particular scene that is so touching as he lies in his bed after being taken in by a family who feed and give Logan, Charles and Laura a room for the night that hints at why there isn’t any mutants anymore and how this is the happiest he has been in as long as he can remember. Stewart as I previously mentioned just slips back into the role but with a bit of cutting humour it must be said that will make you laugh out loud in disbelief with “did he just say the f-word?”

If I had one gripe with this movie it is main villains in Donald Pierce (Boyd Holbrook).Who isn’t the kind of villain that tries to scare you. He just messes around with Logan but will become nasty if needed. Holbrook is a suitable villain for this movie but really is just a bounty hunter who doesn’t have too much to do. We are then introduced to Doctor Rice (Richard E. Grant) who is behind Pierce and who is clearly desperate to retrieve X-23 and take her back to his lab for experimentation I felt was a little villain-light and really just served as the ‘Mad Scientist” behind the plan but with no real punch.

James Mangold manages to capture every element which thrives on the edge of this conflict that he creates. it is beautiful and the talk on the street is whispers of Oscar nominations…..“in March?” you say? Yeah it’s that good. Don’t get me wrong, Director and Writer James Mangold has crafted a very fine film.  He certainly knows how to keep the action flowing and all that bad wire work we saw in the origins movie is nowhere to be seen in this beautifully shot film. Not only are the visuals stunning but the development of all ready established characters might appear to be an easy thing to pick up but Mangold is dealing with “Old Logan” and a decrepit Charles Xavier here and still manages to capture the essence of the characters from the previous movies but adds to their story, sadness, regret and above all…hope for the future of mutants alike.

I believe that this movie will be very well received by fans as the early indications are looking good and some critics are already labelling “Logan” as one of the best comic book movies of all time. I personally consider the film more in the superhero western genre? as it has that gritty feel and texture about it. I highly recommend this movie for all those reasons mentioned because it distinguishes itself from the usual superhero movies. I have all the x-men films and i liked most of them but none of them managed to reach this movie’s level of action or emotion .